Handball and First aid Study Guides – 6th – 8th Grade

The test will be the following days

6th Grade : February 28th – Room 309 and 310  March 1st – Room 308 ( Test on Handball and Heimlich Maneuver)

 

7th Grade: February 19th – Room 304 and 307  February 20th – Room 303( Test on Handball ,Heimlich Maneuver and CPR)

 

8th Grade: February 20  – Room 302. 305 and 306( Test on Handball ,Heimlich Maneuver ,CPR and First Aid)

                                                      TEAM HANDBALL STUDY GUIDE

History

Team Handball originated in Europe in the 1900’s, and recognizes over 140 countries as

members for the International Handball Federation. It started as a field game and had 11 players

on a team. Later due to severe winters, the game was modified to become an indoor sport with

the teams consisting of seven players. Team Handball is a fairly simple game which makes it

possible to enjoy playing fairly soon. The game combines basic skills of running, jumping,

catching, and throwing, goal tending and strategies into a continuous, fast-moving sport which

makes it a good activity for cardiovascular fitness. The game combines skills from soccer,

basketball, and hockey.

 

Basic Rules:

  • The objective of the game is to score a goal by passing the ball quickly and throwing the ball past the defense and goalie and into the goal.
  • A regulation game is played on a floor that is slightly larger than a basketball court.
  • The game consists of two thirty minute halves and each team gets one time out per half.
  • Each successful goal is worth 1 point.
  • The game is started with a coin toss to determine which teams has possession and begins the game with a center throw off (This is a pass to a teammate, like a kick­off in soccer).
  • Teams consist of 7 players (6 court players and one goalkeeper):

Game Play: 

Court Players are allowed to:

  1. Hold the ball without moving for three seconds
  2. Run with the ball for up to three steps before and after dribbles.
  3. Dribble the ball for an unlimited amount of time
  4. Pass and shoot

 

Court Players are not allowed to:

  1. Kick the ball
  2. Contact the ball below the knees.
  3. Double Dribble (dribble, stop, dribble again)
  4. Endanger an opponent with the ball
  5. Pull, hit, or punch the ball out of the hands of an opponent
  6. Step on or across the goal area line

An infraction results in a free throw taken at the point of the infraction

Goalies are allowed to:

  1. Defend the goal using hands, feet and body.
  2. Move outside the goal area and throw for a goal, but must abide by the same rules as court players.
  3. Take more than 3 steps when carrying the ball
  4. Hold the ball longer than 3 seconds.

Goalies are not allowed to:

  1. Leave the goal area while in possession of the ball
  2. Pick up a ball outside the goal area.

An infraction by the goalie will result in a penalty throw.

Goal Area Rules:

  1. Only the goalie is allowed inside the goal area and there must be a goalkeeper at all times.
  2. Players may jump into the goal area if they release the ball before landing in the area.

2. A ball in the goal area belongs to the goalie unless it is in the

 

 

                                       6th Grade Study Guide  For Heimlich Maneuver

Signs of Choking:

  • is unable to breathe
  • is gasping or wheezing
  • can’t talk, cry, or make noise
  • turns blue
  • grabs at his or her throat ( Universal Sign)
  • waves arms
  • appears panicked
  • becomes limp or unconscious

 

 

RELIEF OF CHOKING IN ADULTS AND CHILDREN OVER 1 YEAR OF AGE RESPONSIVE victim:  (Heimlich maneuver)

  1. Use abdominal thrusts.
  2. Stand or kneel behind victim & wrap arms around victim’s waist
  3. Make a fist with 1 hand and place your pinky in their belly button and roll your hand up until your thumb and index finger making contact with the stomach
  4. Grasp fist with other hand and press fist into victim’s abdomen with a quick upward thrust.
  5. Repeat thrusts until object is expelled or victim becomes unresponsive.
  6. Give each new thrust with a separate, distinct movement to relieve obstruction.
  7. If find a responsive choking victim lying down, perform abdominal thrusts with person lying down.

Choking – infant under 1 year:

 

  1. Lay the infant face down, along your forearm. Use your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant’s chest in your hand and hold the jaw with your fingers. Point the infant’s head downward, lower than the body.
  2. Give up to 5 quick, forceful blows between the infant’s shoulder blades. Use the palm of your free hand.

 

If you need to call 911 make sure you give them the information below

 

Information to 911(Dispatcher)

  • Address ( Location)
  • Name
  • What happened to the victim
  • If the victim has a pulse.
  • If the victim is breathing.
  • Is CPR being performed?

                                                               7th Grade Study Guide

 

Scene Safety – Assess the Situation

Ensure that rescuer and victim are in a safe location (e.g., out of a burning building) – In case of trauma, do not move victim unless necessary to ensure victim or rescuer safety.

Make sure the area is safe.

Information to 911(Dispatcher)

  • Address ( Location)
  • Name
  • What happened to the victim
  • If the victim has a pulse.
  • If the victim is breathing.
  • Is CPR being performed?

You hang up after the dispatcher has hung up.

 

Signs of Choking:

  • is unable to breathe
  • is gasping or wheezing
  • can’t talk, cry, or make noise
  • turns blue
  • grabs at his or her throat ( Universal Sign)
  • waves arms
  • appears panicked
  • becomes limp or unconscious

 

 

 

RELIEF OF CHOKING IN ADULTS AND CHILDREN OVER 1 YEAR OF AGE RESPONSIVE victim:  (Heimlich maneuver)

  1. Use abdominal thrusts.
  2. Stand or kneel behind victim & wrap arms around victim’s waist
  3. Make a fist with 1 hand and place your pinky in their belly button and roll your hand up until your thumb and index finger making contact with the stomach
  4. Grasp fist with other hand and press fist into victim’s abdomen with a quick upward thrust.
  5. Repeat thrusts until object is expelled or victim becomes unresponsive.
  6. Give each new thrust with a separate, distinct movement to relieve obstruction.
  7. If find a responsive choking victim lying down, perform abdominal thrusts with person lying down.

Choking – infant under 1 year:

 

  1. Lay the infant face down, along your forearm. Use your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant’s chest in your hand and hold the jaw with your fingers. Point the infant’s head downward, lower than the body.
  2. Give up to 5 quick, forceful blows between the infant’s shoulder blades. Use the palm of your free hand.

 

Where to Check for Pulse:  Carotid Artery

How to turn victim over face down to perform CPR:

  • Put victim’s arms alongside victims head so the elbows are by their ears.
  • Take your closest hand and put your palm on their neck and your fingers on their head. This supports the neck.
  • Take your other hand and place it by their armpit.
  • Roll the victim towards you and always protect the head.

Remember to spell C-A-B

The American Heart Association uses the acronym of CAB — compressions, airway, breathing — to help people remember the order to perform the steps of CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)

Compressions: Restore blood circulation

  1. Put the person on his or her back on a firm surface.
  2. Kneel next to the person’s neck and shoulders.
  3. Place the heel of one hand over the center of the person’s chest, between the nipples. Place your other hand on top of the first hand. Keep your elbows straight and position your shoulders directly above your hands.
  4. Use your upper body weight (not just your arms) as you push straight down on (compress) the chest at least 2 inches (approximately 5 centimeters). Push hard at a rate of about 100 compressions a minute.
  5. If you haven’t been trained in CPR, continue chest compressions until there are signs of movement or until emergency medical personnel take over. If you have been trained in CPR, go on to checking the airway and rescue breathing.

Airway: Clear the airway

  1. If you’re trained in CPR and you’ve performed 30 chest compressions, open the person’s airway using the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver. Put your palm on the person’s forehead and gently tilt the head back. Then with the other hand, gently lift the chin forward to open the airway.
  2. Check for normal breathing, taking no more than five or 10 seconds. Look for chest motion, listen for normal breath sounds, and feel for the person’s breath on your cheek and ear. Gasping is not considered to be normal breathing. If the person isn’t breathing normally and you are trained in CPR, begin mouth-to-mouth breathing. If you believe the person is unconscious from a heart attack and you haven’t been trained in emergency procedures, skip mouth-to-mouth breathing and continue chest compressions.

 

 

 

Breathing: Breathe for the person

Rescue breathing can be mouth-to-mouth breathing or mouth-to-nose breathing if the mouth is seriously injured or can’t be opened.

  1. With the airway open (using the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver), pinch the nostrils shut for mouth-to-mouth breathing and cover the person’s mouth with yours, making a seal.
  2. Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Give the first rescue breath — lasting one second — and watch to see if the chest rises. If it does rise, give the second breath. If the chest doesn’t rise, repeat the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver and then give the second breath. 30 chest compressions followed by 2 rescue breaths is considered one cycle.
  3. Resume chest compressions to restore circulation.
  4. If the person has not begun moving after five cycles (about two minutes) and an automated external defibrillator (AED) is available, apply it and follow the prompts. Administer one shock, and then resume CPR — starting with chest compressions — for two more minutes before administering a second shock. If you’re not trained to use an AED, a 911 or other emergency medical operator may be able to guide you in its use. If an AED isn’t available, go to step 5 below.
  5. Continue CPR until there are signs of movement or emergency medical personnel take over.

 

                                                                           8th Grade Study Guide

Basic First Aid Guide

 

Information to 911(Dispatcher)

  • Address ( Location)
  • Name
  • What happened to the victim
  • If the victim has a pulse.
  • If the victim is breathing.
  • Is CPR being performed?

You hang up after the dispatcher has hung up

 

 

Hands Only CPR

 

  • Call 911
  • Check for pulse at the carotid artery
  • Do Head Tilt to check for breathing – Look, Listen and Feel
  • Push hard and fast at the center of the chest ( Between the nipples) – 100 Compression per minute

 

 

Conventional CPR

 

  • Call 911

 

  • Infants: Place 2-3 fingers below nipple line. 30 (1/2 – 1 in) compressions. 2 gentle breaths until chest rises. 100 comp/min

 

  • Children: Use 1-2 hands in center of chest. 30 (1-1 ½ in) compressions. 2 breaths until chest rises. 100 comp / min

 

  • Adults: Use 2 hands. 30 (1-2 in) compressions in center of chest. 2 long breaths until chest rises. 100 comp / min

 

 

 

Major Bleeding

 

  • Call 911 and put on gloves (or a plastic bag)

 

  • Have person lie down with head lower than body.

 

  • Remove obvious objects from wound, but don’t clean it. DO NOT remove deeply embedded objects.

 

  • Apply direct pressure with gauze / clothing until bleeding stops (don’t “look” for at least 20 min), and apply pressure around deeply embedded objects, not over them.

 

  • Do not remove gauze / bandage. Simply keep adding more as needed

 

  • If limb (arm / leg) is bleeding, elevate it.

 

Major (not minor) Burns:

 

  • Call 911

 

  • Do not remove clothing

 

  • Do not immerse in cold water

 

  • Begin CPR if needed

 

  • Elevate burned parts of body above heart if possible

 

  • Cover burn with a cool, moist, sterile bandage or cloth or towel

 

Chemical Burn

  • Brush off chemical away from the eyes
  • Run under cold water for 15 minutes

 

 

Hypothermia   – Hypothermia is a medical emergency that occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat, causing a dangerously low body temperature.

 

 

  • Begin CPR if necessary

 

  • Protect from wind & cover head

 

  • Remove wet clothing, but do not massage / rub

 

  • Do not use hot water / heating pad and do not apply anything hot or warm to limbs.

 

  • Apply warmth to center of body only (Wrap in a blanket)

 

Hyperthermia (Heat Stroke) – Hyperthermia refers to a group of heat-related conditions characterized by an abnormally high body temperature .

 

  • Move into shady / air conditioned space and call 911

 

  • Do not immerse in cold water

 

  • Cover with damp sheets, spray with water and fan

 

  • Have person drink anything without alcohol or caffeine

 

Seizure

During the seizure

  • Protect the patient from injury by removing any objects that could cause injury.
  • Protect the patient’s head by place something soft under their head and shoulders.
  • Time the seizure

After the seizure

  • Put the patient in the recovery position( Roll on Side) as soon as jerking stops, so if they vomit they will not choke

Amputation

  • Gently clean the amputated part with water or, if possible, with sterile saline solution.
  • Cover it in a moistened gauze wrap.
  • Place it in a watertight bag.
  • Place the bag on ice in a sealed container or another watertight bag.
  • Do not allow the amputated part to be in direct contact with ice. You could damage it further

Bee Sting

  • Remove the stinger -If thestinger remains in your skin, remove it by scraping over it with your fingernail or a piece of gauze. Never use tweezers to remove a stinger, as squeezing it can cause more venom to release into your skin.
  • Wash thesting with soap and water
  • Apply a cold pack to the bitten or stung area for 15 minutes and reapply if pain continues.

 

 

Diabetic Emergency (Low sugar)

  • Help the patient to sit or lie in a comfortable position.
  • Reassure the patient.
  • Loosen any tight clothing.
  • Give the patient sugar, such as fruit juice or a soft drink (NOT ‘diet’ eg Coke Zero, Pepsi Max), sugar, jellybeans, glucose tablets.
  • Continue giving sugar every 15 minutes until the patient recovers.

 

Object stuck in Arm

  • Do not remove the impaled object!Impaled objects create a puncture wound and by removing the impaled object, you run the risk of triggering bleeding that now cannot be stopped with external pressure.
  • Secure the object and call 911 or go to the emergency room

 

Choking

 

Signs of Choking:

  • is unable to breathe
  • is gasping or wheezing
  • can’t talk, cry, or make noise
  • turns blue
  • grabs at his or her throat ( Universal Sign)
  • waves arms
  • appears panicked
  • becomes limp or unconscious

 

RELIEF OF CHOKING IN ADULTS AND CHILDREN OVER 1 YEAR OF AGE RESPONSIVE victim: 

(Heimlich maneuver)

  1. Use abdominal thrusts.
  2. Stand or kneel behind victim & wrap arms around victim’s waist
  3. Make a fist with 1 hand and place your pinky in their belly button and roll your hand up until your thumb and index finger making contact with the stomach
  4. Grasp fist with other hand and press fist into victim’s abdomen with a quick upward thrust.
  5. Repeat thrusts until object is expelled or victim becomes unresponsive.
  6. Give each new thrust with a separate, distinct movement to relieve obstruction.
  7. If find a responsive choking victim lying down, perform abdominal thrusts with person lying down.

 

Choking – infant under 1 year:

 

  1. Lay the infant face down, along your forearm. Use your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant’s chest in your hand and hold the jaw with your fingers. Point the infant’s head downward, lower than the body.
  2. Give up to 5 quick, forceful blows between the infant’s shoulder blades. Use the palm of your free hand.

 

 

Heimlich on pregnant / obese:

 

  • Place hands higher at base of breastbone.

 

Heimlich on unconscious:

 

  • Do not perform. Lie on back and dislodge item if possible. Then, do CRP instead.